Michael L. Rosenberg Lectures

This series brings a scholar or curator to Dallas each year to discuss works of art in the Michael L. Rosenberg Collection, a distinguished group of 18th-century French paintings and sculptures.

Good Dog! Jean-Baptiste Oudry and the Politics of Animal Painting

Tenth Annual Michael L. Rosenberg Lecture

Dog painting was serious business in 18th-century France. Jean-Baptiste Oudry's Water Spaniel Confronting a Heron and Study of a Hound Baying are more than simple studies of animals. Dr. Amy Freund, assistant professor of art history at Texas Christian University, takes a closer look at these paintings in which the dogs' bodies stand in for the human bodies of their owners and viewers, serving as proxies in the era's most pressing debates about personhood, violence, and privilege.  

On the Run: Clodion's Bacchanalian Figures

Anne Poulet, former director of the Frick Collection, discusses the work of French sculptor Clodion, including two masterpieces in the Michael L. Rosenberg Collection. These terracotta sculptures of running bacchantes, followers of the Roman god Bacchus, are perfect examples of the artist's technical prowess and dynamism.  This is the ninth annual lecture in the series.

November 8, 2012

Horchow Auditorium

 

"Beguiling Deception": Allegorical Portraiture in Early 18th-Century France

In 18th-century France, fashionable patrons commissioned “allegorical portraits,” which showed their subjects as classical goddesses, muses, or other mythological figures. Dr. Kathleen Nicholson, Professor of Art History at the University of Oregon, investigates Nicolas de Largillière's portrait of the Countess of Montsoreau and her sister as the goddess Diana and an attendant.  (Seventh Annual Rosenberg Lecture)

January 27, 2011

Horchow Auditorium